After Emily

The Untold Tale of the Women Who Introduced Emily Dickinson to the World

Mabel Loomis Todd. Mabel Loomis Todd Papers (MS 496C). Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.
Mabel Loomis Todd.
Mabel Loomis Todd Papers (MS 496C). Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.

By the fall of 1883, it was the dirty little secret that everyone in the small college town of Amherst, Massachusetts seemed to know. Beautiful, young and ambitious Mabel Loomis Todd was in love with Austin Dickinson, scion of a venerable old New England family. Mabel once wrote in her journal of their relationship, “I have read a great many stories, and I have had a good many love letters, and I have heard a good many lovers talk, but I never heard or read or imagined such a wonderful…or so divine a love as he has for me.  No souls were ever so united, no love story approaches it.”

But Mabel and Austin were married – to other people.  Austin, who was almost three decades older than Mabel, was also the brother of the reclusive and brilliant Emily Dickinson.

Mabel came to know Emily through her relationship with Austin. And she came to know Emily’s unique poetry. After Emily died it was Mabel who first  brought Emily’s poetry to print, Mabel who conceived an original plan to market the unusual verse and Mabel who launched the image of the secluded poet garbed in white we still know today.

Austin Dickinson
Austin Dickinson

What we don’t know is the story of the ways in which Mabel’s controversial work editing and promoting Emily’s poetry figured into a complicated web of relationships between members of the Dickinson family and the Todds that lasted for generations.

Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson

After Emily is a mother/daughter biography of Mabel and her only child, Millicent Todd Bingham. This book tells the story of Mabel’s thirteen year-long love affair with Austin and how this relationship led her to the Emily Dickinson work that defined her career and her life.  It will be published by W.W. Norton & Company.

Their relationship also complicated Mabel’s already complex relationship with Millicent, especially when, years after Austin had died, Mabel turned to Millicent and asked her for help in bringing out a new edition of Emily’s poetry and letters to mark the centenary of her birth. The multifaceted passions in both Mabel and Millicent’s lives ultimately resulted in controversies over the editing and ownership of Emily Dickinson’s poetry, in her papers being split up, and in battles over the right to define the so-called “Belle of Amherst.” This is a story that has never before been fully told.